A Fable for Workingmen

Dublin Core

Title

A Fable for Workingmen

Description

Also known as "The Workingman and the Thinkingman"

Date

Bibliographic Citation

Bolton Hall, “A Fable for Workingmen,” To-Morrow 2, no. 7 (July 1906): 67.

Document Item Type Metadata

Text

A Fable for Workingmen

 

A workingman had a bit of ground on which he lived. It seemed to be worth very little, so, after a while he gave it to the Thinkingman.

Nevertheless the Workingman had to live on the land, so the Thinkingman charged him rent. Then the Workingman called the Thinkingman a Monopolist. The Thinkingman thought and made a law: then he nominated lawmakers and the Workingman voted for them—the lawmakers adopted a constitution to prevent any change.

The Workingman worked and made a gun. Then he gave it to the Thinkingman for the rent. The Thinkingman said, “What good is a gun to me unless I have a man to use it? I can’t risk my own life.” So the Workingman voted an appropriation out of his wages to the Thinkingman to hire a man to use the gun. Then the Workingman called the Thinkingman an Aristocrat.

 

The appropriation set the Workingman behind in his rent, so the Thinkingman sent the hired man (with the gun) to turn the Workingman out of his tenement. The Workingman called the Thinkingman an Oppressor.

Now the question is. Who really disposs[ess]ed the Workingman?

 

Bolton Hall, “A Fable for Workingmen,” To-Morrow 2, no. 7 (July 1906): 67.

 

Files

Citation

Hall, Bolton, 1854-1938, “A Fable for Workingmen,” The Libertarian Labyrinth, accessed October 18, 2019, http://library.libertarian-labyrinth.org/items/show/2411.